Tag Archives: physics

Speccy – Spectrum Analyser

I created an Audio Spectrum Analyser app which has proved very popular (over 100k downloads and counting). Turn your phone into a professional spectrum analysis tool and break into safes – um, please don’t use it for that 😉

How does it work?

The app uses an FFT algorithm to analyse sound and has some features not found in similar apps. Check it out!

What can it be used for?

There are many uses for spectrum analyzers, such as:

    Assessing environmental noise for health and safety
    Sound checking speaker setups, PA systems and in-car stereos
    • Identifying audio signals obscured to the human ear by noise
    • Testing the microphone on your device
    • Comparing the quality of different brands of headphones
    • Testing signal generators
    • Tuning musical instruments
    • Measuring audio signals just outside human perception. As people age over 20 years, their aural perception range drops well below 21 kHz

Speccy has also been used to find gas leaks and even hunt
 
ghosts
, apparently!

How to use it

For mixing or calibrating audio equipment, watch these handy videos or see the articles below, have a look at this article on using spectrum analyzers, this one on using spectrum analyzers for mixing, or watch these useful videos:

More articles

I occasionally give away a few copies of Speccy, when there are promo codes available. Here’s a random promo code from the database, which someone may or may not have used already 🙂

Contribute

For those interested in helping me correct or add more translations, see this github repo.

Get the app

Go get Speccy Spectrum Analyzer.




 

Unity tips – avoiding collisions

Are you developing a Unity game and wondering how to make an object or group of objects NOT collide with certain other objects? Then read on…

Continue reading Unity tips – avoiding collisions

A literally ‘gripping’ banner

Just looking through some old work and found a banner I had created years ago. I know, I know, a banner – but, as banners go, it’s rather awesome 🙂

I created this for the BBC, to advertise a game related to one of their TV shows. It employs some pretty clever maths to animate some creepy vines which actually reach out to ‘grab’ your mouse cursor – have a play! (requires Flash)

If you’re on mobile, or don’t have Flash enabled on your browser, you can see the banner in action below:

Lurpak Breakfast – Behind the screens

Winning two DMA awards back in 2009, I thought I’d give a quick insight into how the animation effects in this piece were achieved. Continue reading Lurpak Breakfast – Behind the screens

Mercedes Bend – Physics based banner animation

What I love even more than doing animation, is doing challenging code-driven animation.

This banner actually won some awards apparently, including NMA Campaign of the Month and was shortlisted for Cannes Lions.The line dynamics itself is just Hooke’s law stuff – basic physics. Took some experimentation to get a smooth curve drawn through a series of points (basicaly, the control points of your previous and next points need to be in line).

If you can’t see the demo above because you’re on mobile, or don’t have Flash enabled on your browser, you can see the banner in action below:

The cars follow one of the line’s points with differing elasticity and damping, but the real pain in the backside was drawing the dashed line via code, in crummy ActionScript. Luckily, I’m a persistent bastard 🙂 Read more about it on Bannerblog.

Wobbly springy physics

I recently needed to create something where a chain of spring dynamics points is connected with one smooth, seamless curve. After much mathematical wrangling, here’s the result of my efforts – you can grab and drag the grey blobs…