Tag Archives: mobile

Unity – automatically choosing key or accelerometer input

I┬áknocked up a quick demo to show how you might create a Unity game, which uses either keyboard input, or the accelerometer of a mobile device, without having to change any code, include any third party libraries, or use conditional compilation. Continue reading Unity – automatically choosing key or accelerometer input

Sneaky tricks for developing on small devices – Bitmap ‘folding’

DSC_1583One of the most problematic constraints when developing applications for mobile or Set Top Box is video memory (AKA VRAM). You often will not have control over how much video memory is allocated to your application, or what the fallback behaviour is when your application uses too much. Continue reading Sneaky tricks for developing on small devices – Bitmap ‘folding’

Super Kickups returns… as an Android app

Super Kickups mobile gameAddictive as crack – apparently

I finally decided to relaunch one of my classic old Flash games as a mobile app. I picked Super Kickups since I think the game mechanic works nicely on a touchscreen – that, and someone once told me that it’s addictive as crack – which I take as a compliment. I’ve recently added a leaderboard and I’ll be adding various other features, such as pickups and achievements, in the near future.

I used Starling for the rendering and it runs smoothly at 60fps on both my shiny new HTC and my somewhat slower old Sony Xperia. It’d be good to know how it runs on a range of other devices – especially if anyone finds the performance slow.

I’m not planning to target iOS just yet though, being a bigger fan of Android (perhaps Apple could make iOS less of a pain in the proverbial). You can download it from the Google Play Store here.

Take two tablets and call me in the morning

Well, it’s been a while. Having spent the last 8 months working on the YouView set top box platform, I’ve been so busy that I wasn’t even sure my site was still up. And now that I’ve dived headlong into the tricky world of embedded systems development, I wanted to starting playing with other platforms out there. The first two that recently caught my eye were Apple iOS (specifically the iPad) and the new Blackberry PlayBook.

I was keen to see what the application development process is like for these two platforms, especially for Flash Developers and how the two Big Tablets, iPad and PlayBook, measurement up as potential target platforms for the crazy ideas in my head that I’d want to build. So, I made the first steps at development for both.

iPad
Now that Adobe is ‘allowed’ to pursue iOS as a target platform for AIR, via its cross-compiler again, I went through the process of signing up as an iOS developer, jumping through the various other hoops and getting my first ‘hello world’ app onto my iPad. The whole process is a lot more complicated than it probably could be, but then, the same could be said of device development at YouView – this is the nature of such platforms, they are emerging technologies and, as such, are moving targets and simply not like the desktop machines we are all used to developing for. I have to say though, I’m impressed with the recent leaps in performance and functionality Adobe has made with AIR 2.6 for iOS – it leaves Packager in the dust.

PlayBook
Perhaps because the tool chain for PlayBook development feels more like developing for YouView, I was more comfortable with developing for the Playbook and managed to crack out a very simple app, getting in App World in a matter of a couple of days.

Now that I’ve stepped well outside the desktop comfort zone, I have been playing for a while with resource constrained device development, hardware acceleration of Flash content and developing an unhealthy obsession for writing clean, memory/rendering performance optimal code. I hope to bring some of this to projects for iOS and Playbook, as well as share what I’ve learned over the last year.

Blue lego block of ambiguity

At the risk of getting sucked into the Apple vs Adobe shitstorm, my own response to Apple chosing to block Flash content from their mobile devices is to at least tell users why – because Apple left it at the rather obscure blue lego block, with no explanation (great experiential design guys). Simply include this code in your page/s to redirect mobile safari users to a page of your chosing …I direct them here.